The Quick and Dirty Deduplication Analyzer

The best thing about being me… There are so many “me”s.

— Agent Smith, The Matrix Reloaded

One of our customers reported less than optimal space savings on XtremIO running Oracle. In order to test various scenarios with Oracle I was in search of a deduplication analysis method or tool – only to find out that there was nothing available that qualified.

TL;DR: QDDA is an Open Source tool I wrote to analyze Linux files, devices or data streams for duplicate blocks and compression estimates. It can quickly give you an idea of how much storage savings you could get using a modern All-Flash Array like XtremIO. It is safe to use on production systems and allows quick analysis of various test scenarios giving direct results, and even works with files/devices that are in use. No registration or uploading of your confidential data is required.

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Oracle ASM vs ZFS on VNX

swiss-cheeseIn my last post on ZFS I shared results of a lab test where ZFS was configured on Solaris x86 and using XtremIO storage. A strange combination maybe but this is what a specific customer asked for.

Another customer requested a similar test with ZFS versus ASM but on Solaris/SPARC and on EMC VNX. Also very interesting as on VNX we’re using spinning disk (not all-flash) so the effects of fragmentation over time should be much more visible.

So with support of the local administrators, I performed a similar test as the one before: start on ASM and get baseline random and sequential performance numbers, then move the tablespace (copy) to ZFS so you start off with as little fragmentation as possible. Then run random read/write followed by sequential read, multiple times and see how the I/O behaves.
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Oracle ASM vs ZFS on XtremIO

zfs-asm-plateBackground

In my previous post on ZFS I showed how ZFS causes fragmentation for Oracle database files. At the end I promised (sort of) to also come back on topic around how this affects database performance. In the meantime I have been busy with many other things, but ZFS issues still sneak up on me frequently. Eventually, I was forced to take another look at this because of two separate customers asking for ZFS comparisons agaisnt ASM at the same time.

The account team for one of the two customers asked if I could perform some testing on their lab environment to show the performance difference between Oracle on ASM and on ZFS. As things happen in this business, things were already rolling before I could influence the prerequisites and the suggested test method. Promises were already made to the customer and I was asked to produce results yesterday.

Without knowledge on the lab environment, customer requirements or even details on the test environment they had set up. Typical day at the office.

In addition to that, ZFS requires a supported host OS – so Linux is out of the question (the status on kernel ZFS for Linux is still a bit unclear and certainly it would not be supported with Oracle). I had been using FreeBSD in my post on fragmentation – because that was my platform of choice at that point (my Solaris skills are, at best, rusty). Of course Oracle on FreeBSD is a no-go so back then, I used NFS to run the database on Linux and ZFS on BSD. Which implicitly solves some of the potential issues whilst creating some new ones, but alas.

Solaris x86

slob-rules-kenteken
This time the idea was to run Oracle on Solaris (x86) that had both ZFS and ASM configured. How to perform a reasonable comparison that also shows the different behavior was unclear and when asking that question to the account team, the conference call line stayed surprisingly silent. All that they indicated up front is that the test tool on Oracle should be SLOB.

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ZFS and Database fragmentation

Disk Fragmentation

Disk Fragmentation – O&O technologies.
Hope they don’t mind the free advertising

Yet another customer was asking me for advice on implementing the ZFS file system on EMC storage systems. Recently I did some hands-on testing with ZFS as Oracle database file store so that I could get an opinion on the matter.

One of the frequent discussions comes up is on the fragmentation issue. ZFS uses a copy-on-write allocation mechanism which basically means, every time you write to a block on disk (whether this is a newly allocated block, or, very important, overwriting a previously allocated one) ZFS will buffer the data and write it out on a completely new location on disk. In other words, it will never overwrite data in place. Now a lot of discussions can be found in the blogosphere and on forums debating whether this is really the case, how serious this is, what the impact is on performance and what ZFS has done to either prevent, or, alternatively, to mitigate the issue (i.e. by using caching, smart disk allocation algorithms, etc).

In this post I attempt to prove how database files on ZFS file systems get fragmented on disk quickly. I will not make any comments on how this affects performance (I’ll save that for a future post). I also deliberately ignore ZFS caching and other optimizing features – the only thing I want to show right now is how much fragmentation is caused on physical disk by using ZFS for Oracle data files. Note that this is a deep technical and lengthy article so you might want to skip all the details and jump right to the conclusion at the bottom :-)

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Oracle snapshots and clones with ZFS

Another Frequently Asked Question: Is there any disadvantage for a customer in using Oracle/SUN ZFS appliances to create database/application snapshots in comparison with EMC’s cloning/snapshot offerings?

Oracle marketing is pushing materials where they promote the ZFS storage appliance as the ultimate method for database cloning, especially when the source database is on Exadata. Essentially the idea is as follows: backup your primary DB to the ZFS appliance, then create snaps or clones off the backup for testing and development (more explanation in Oracle’s paper and video). Of course it is marketed as being much cheaper, easier and faster than using storage from an Enterprise Storage system such as those offered by EMC.

Oracle Youtube video

Oracle White paper

In order to understand the limitations of the ZFS appliance you need to know the fundamental workings of the ZFS filesystem. I recommend you look at the Wikipedia article on ZFS (here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZFS) and get familiar with its basic principles and features. The ZFS appliance is based on the same filesystem but due to it being an appliance, it’s a little bit different in behaviour.

So let’s see what a customer gets when he decides to go for the Sun appliance instead of EMC infrastructure (such as the Data Domain backup deduplication  system or VNX storage system).

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